A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol

DVD - 2007 | Ultimate collector's ed.
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i
iloveseaotters
May 24, 2019

Alister Sim's Scrooge, in addition to being a wonderful film, is sentimental for me because when I was in school they used to show this film in all the classrooms on the day we got out of school for Christmas vacation. I always associate "Scrooge" with that happy memory. After I bought a copy for myself, I grew to love this movie in more ways than one. It has some dark moments (not scary, but intense), as well as some touching and downright hilarious ones. I could watch this multiple times in one holiday season and never get tired of it. Alastir Sim is brilliant as Ebenezer Scrooge, who, after an unwanted visit from three spirits, realizes the true meaning of Christmas. As Tiny Tim once observed..."God bless us every one"!

h
HKMar
Nov 27, 2018

Although it is considered the best version of A Christmas Carol, I found Tiny Tim to be not soo tiny. A classic none the less. A great movie to watch with loved ones or by yourself.

m
Mustanggt351
Jun 09, 2018

The best version.

p
PatEe
Jan 16, 2017

Still the best version of this classic story. I was a bit afraid the colourization might ruin it, but it is still good. Alastair Sim is Scrooge. No one else could ever do it as well as he does.

d2013 Nov 25, 2016

Great holiday classic!

r
RoyalJellyIII
Dec 21, 2015

Perhaps the best screen performance of Scrooge ever by Alastair Sim- another Christmas classic!

davex Nov 22, 2014

look for camera man in mirrow xmas morn cheers

h
hoacornell
Nov 18, 2014

Although there are many productions of "A Christmas Carol" you will find the best to be Alistair Sims version of Scrooge to be the best portrayal. KCLS has 2 copies and only 5 holds on them as of today. You could have this before Christmas with no problem.

t
tgwilliams
Nov 13, 2014

The one and only "A Christmas Carol" with Alistair Sims classic!

m
mswrite
Oct 16, 2014

Over the years I have seen some wonderful productions of this classic Charles Dickens tale (including the delightful 1962 animated version that features the Mr. Magoo character), but Alastair Sim's performance as Scrooge makes this one the definitive.

In the first part of the story Sim radiates a sneering self-satisfaction that makes his Ebeneezer Scrooge especially despicable. But his heartlessness makes his redemption all the more emotionally satisfying as he seeks to convince his nephew Fred and long-suffering employee Bob Cratchit of his new goodwill and sincerity.

The moment in this movie that always get me is the Christmas morning encounter between Scrooge and his Cockney housekeeper, played by Kathleen Harrison. Mr. Scrooge has just emerged from his long night of reckoning with the spirits, and is now filled with hope and excitement. The first flesh and blood person Scrooge encounters--he is still in his dressing gown, his hair wild and disheveled--is the hapless Mrs. Dilber. He is so giddy with happiness and new-found charity he terrifies her--this is NOT the Mr. Scrooge she is accustomed to dealing with. He tries to hug her and she recoils, fearing the master has gone mad. She struggles to get away.

That pained expression on Sim's face. It is almost unbearable to watch as Mrs. Dilber's fear registers and Scooge realizes what her frightened disbelief says, not about her but about him--the man he has been and the shabby way he has always treated her.
He gently assures her he is quite sane and presses into her hands more money than he has ever given her, more probably than she has ever seen in her life.

Mrs. Dilber stares at Scrooge, trying to understand. As it dawns on her that he is in earnest her face becomes radiant; now she is the giddy one; she is almost beside herself with joy.

"Merry Christmas, Mr. Scrooge," she cries, adding as she rushes down the stairs "--in keeping with the situation!!"

e
eastvanbookfan
Jul 02, 2014

I usually watch this right after midnight Christmas eve. Was required watching as a child but deep down I have never HAD to watch it. My favourite version of the story.......

Joe_Brusky Apr 30, 2013

This is about the 2012 remastered video... WOW! It's as though years of wear and tear were removed even compared to the restored 2007 release! On a quick review, the cropping in older editions is tighter meaning a lot of the original image was not being shown in other version, plus this one runs 7 minutes longer. As to the actual film, it is as everyone here has said - a CLASSIC - and probably one of the best versions ever made. I find something endering in each one so that's the joy of this Dicken's syory showing through.

l
lilly56
Dec 09, 2012

i really liked this movie cant wait to watch it again

m
Monolith
Dec 02, 2012

I'm on the same page as the other Ebenezer connoisseurs (of good taste). Sims is THE definitive Scrooge. I feel sorry for those perhaps unappreciative of, uninterested in, or unfamiliar with this cherished classic version. (The '35 is an additional vintage nugget.) My second choice would be... George C. Scott. Patrick Stewart, third. Finally, Jim Backus/aka Mr. Magoo. (Sorry Jim Carrey. Haven't seen it; don't intend to...) And I also feel that b&w is the only true choice, also. Hands down. The shadowy, spooky atmosphere isn't as effective with color. Colorized/shmullerized. Ick. FIVE STARS.

r
rslade
Sep 21, 2011

This is it. This is the classic. Alastair Sims is the one against whom all other Scrooges are measured, and no one has yet measured up. A bit caricaturish to begin with, but the gradual reformation is the best of all the versions. It is too bad that the short time means a number of scenes in the book are left out, particularly during the "Christmas Present" visitation, but overall they did a good job of choosing to include representative scenes. The additional 1935 version is worth having a look at, as well.

h
Horseshoe
Mar 10, 2011

This is my favourite version of this classic Christmas movie.

k
KCLibraryGuy
Dec 08, 2010

There are many versions of "A Christmas Carol," but many consider this 1951 British version the best.


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